Posts Tagged ‘foreclosure’

Real Estate 101 Glossary “G & H”

November 2, 2009

Lola and me!cid_image6I am combining these two today.  Enjoy

GABLE ROOF   A steeply angled, triangular roof.

GALVANIZED PIPE  Iron pipe with a galvanized (zinc) coating.

GAMBREL ROOF  A ”barn-like” roof, where the upper portion of the roof is less-steeply angled than the lower part.

GENERAL LIEN  A broad-based claim against several properties owned by a defaulting party.

GEORGIAN   A classic, English-style hose characterized by simple rectangular shape and multiple stories.

GFI   Ground Fault Interrupter. A type of circuit breaker required in areas where water is present.

GINNIE MAE   A wholly owned corporation created in 1968 within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to serve low-to moderate-income homebuyers.

GIRDER   A main supporting beam.

GOVERNMENT MORTGAGE  
Any mortgage insured by a government agency, such as the FHA or VA.

GRADE   The slope of land around a building. Also ground level.

GRANTEE   Any person who is given ownership of a piece of property.

GRANTOR   Any person who gives away ownership of a piece of property.

GROSS AREA   
The sum total of all floor space, including areas such as stairways and closet space. Often measured based on external wall lengths.

GROUTING   Material used around ceramic tile.

GUTTER The trough around the edge of the roof that catches and diverts rain.

HALF-SECTION   320 acres.

HAZARD INSURANCE   
Insurance covering damage to a property caused by hazards such as fire, wind and accident.

HEADER   
The framing elements above an opening such as a window or door.

HEARTH   
The floor of a fireplace or the area immediately in front of it.

HEIGHT ZONING   A municipal restriction on the maximum height of any building or other structure.

HIDDEN AMENITIES   
Assets of a property which contribute to its value, but are not readily apparent. Examples might include upgraded or premium building materials.

HIGHEST AND BEST USE   The most profitable and likely use of a property. Selected from reasonably probable and legal alternative uses, which are found to be physically possible, appropriately supported and financially feasible to result in the highest possible land value.

HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE (HECM)   
Also known as a reverse annuity mortgage. It allows home owners (usually older) to convert equity in the home into cash. Normally paid by the lender in monthly payments. HECM’s typically do not have to be repaid until the borrower is no longer occupying the home.

HOME EQUITY LINE OF CREDIT   
A type of mortgage loan that allows the borrower to draw cash against the equity in his home.

HOME INSPECTION   
A complete examination of a building to determine its structural integrity and uncover any defects in materials or workmanship which may adversely affect the property or decrease its value.

HOME INSPECTOR   A person who performs professional home inspections. Usually, with an extensive knowledge of house construction methods, common house problems, how to identify those problems and how to correct them.

HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION   
An organization of home owners in a particular neighborhood or development formed to facilitate the maintenance of common areas and to enforce any building restrictions or covenants.

HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE   
A policy which covers a home owner for any loss of property due to accident, intrusion or hazard.

HOMEOWNER’S WARRANTY   
An insurance policy covering the repair of systems and appliances within the home for the coverage period.

HUD MEDIAN INCOME   
Median family income for a particular county or metropolitan statistical area (MSA), as estimated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

HUD-1 STATEMENT   A standardized, itemized list, published by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), of all anticipated CLOSING COSTS connected with a particular property purchase.

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How to buy a bank owned Foreclosure (REO)

October 29, 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM7oWKgCVo4&feature=player_embedded

 

 

 

Avoid Foreclosure Press Release

May 16, 2009

CDPE logo colorclip art houseDonna Benton EARNS PRESTIGIOUS DESIGNATION TO HELP HOMEOWNERS IN DANGER OF FORECLOSURE

 

Donna Benton “D.B.” of RE/MAX Marquee Partners has earned the prestigious Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE) designation, having completed extensive training in foreclosure avoidance and short sales. This is invaluable expertise to offer at a time when the area is ravaged by “distressed” homes in the foreclosure process.

Short sales allow the cash-strapped seller to repay the mortgage at the price that the home sells for, even though it is lower than what is owed on the property. With plummeting property values, this can save many people from foreclosure and even bankruptcy. More and more lenders are willing to consider short sales because they are much less costly than foreclosures.

In the Los Angeles area, a number of homes are in danger of foreclosing. It is happening in all price ranges. Local experts say that even high-priced homes are not immune.

“This CDPE designation has been invaluable as I work with sellers and lenders on complicated short sales,” said Benton. “It is so rewarding to be able to help sellers save their homes from foreclosure.”

Alex Charfen, founder of the Distressed Property Institute in Boca Raton, Fla., said that Realtors® such as Donna Benton with the CDPE designation have valuable training in short sales that can offer the homeowner much better alternatives to foreclosure, which virtually destroys the credit rating. These experts also may better understand market conditions and can help sellers through the emotional experience, he said.

The Distressed Property Institute opened in January 2008 and provides training on-site and online. The CDPE is the premier designation for Realtors helping homeowners in distress and handling short sales.

Our goal is to educate as many people as possible so we can help as many homeowners as possible,” Charfen said.

For a confidentional and FREE  consultation contact Donna directly at 310-398-2332.

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The Fed’s Alternative to Foreclosure

May 15, 2009

This was excerpted from the California Association of Realtors press release:

This pretty much mirrors the FHA and VA policy for Short Sales.

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Good news from Washington, D.C., today. The Obama administration announced new details under its Foreclosure Alternatives Program (FAP) enabling servicers and borrowers to pursue short sales and deeds-in-lieu (DIL) of foreclosure in cases where the borrower is generally eligible for a Making Home Affordable modification but does not qualify or is unable to successfully complete the three month trial period. The program, effective through 2012, requires that prior to proceeding with a foreclosure, servicers must determine if a short sale is appropriate. We’re gratified that the administration has recognized the need to streamline the short sale and deeds-in-lieu processes, and has provided viable options to homeowners who have fallen behind on their mortgages but owe more than their homes would sell for in today’s challenging market. We also appreciate the efforts of our colleagues at NAR for keeping this issue front and center in our nation’s capital. Incentives in the FAP program include $1,000 for servicers for successful completion of a short sale or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure; $1,500 for borrowers/homeowners to help with relocation expenses; and up to $1,000 toward the cost of paying junior lien holders to release their liens ($1 from the government for every $2 paid by the investors to the second lien holders). The FAP includes streamlined and standardized documents, including a Short Sale Agreement and an Offer Acceptance Letter to minimize complexity and increase use of the short sale option. Servicers will independently establish both property value and minimum acceptable net return, in accordance with investor requirements, based on an appraisal or one or more broker price opinions, issued no more than 120 days before the date of the short sale agreement. In the Short Sale Agreement, servicers must give borrowers/homeowners at least 90 days to market and sell the property, or up to one year, depending on market conditions. The property also must be listed with a licensed real estate professional with experience in the neighborhood, and no foreclosure may take place during the marketing period, of at least 90 days, as specified in the Short Sale Agreement. The Short Sale Agreement also must specify the reasonable and customary real estate commissions and costs that may be deducted from the sales price. The servicer must agree not to negotiate a lower commission after an offer has been received. Servicers may not charge fees to borrowers/homeowners for participating in the program. Servicers have the option to require the borrower/homeowner to agree to deed the property to the servicer in exchange for a release from the debt if the property does not sell within the time allowed in the Short Sale Agreement, plus any extensions. Additional details will be forthcoming. Please check C.A.R.’s Market Response Center for updated information as it becomes available.

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